1. text

    Invictus

    misswallflower:

    "Out of the night that covers me,
    Black as the pit from pole to pole,
    I thank whatever gods may be
    For my unconquerable soul.

    In the fell clutch of circumstance
    I have not winced nor cried aloud.
    Under the bludgeonings of chance
    My head is bloody, but unbowed.

    Beyond this place of wrath…

  2. moonlight-driive:

    "Her blonde hair was part of an attempt to to start over and adopt a new persona, following her first suicide attempt in August of 1953." Plath, who had spent six months in psychiatric care following the suicide attempt, had seemed to improve greatly by the the summer of 1954. This period of time has been lovingly referred to by her biographers as her “platinum summer.”

    (via langleav)

  3. text

    "Life will break you. Nobody can protect you from that, and living alone won’t either, for solitude will also break you with its yearning. You have to love. You have to feel. It is the reason you are here on earth. You are here to risk your heart. You are here to be swallowed up. And when it happens that you are broken, or betrayed, or left, or hurt, or death brushes near, let yourself sit by an apple tree and listen to the apples falling all around you in heaps, wasting their sweetness. Tell yourself you tasted as many as you could."

    Louise Erdrich, The Painted Drum LP (via observando)

    (via langleav)

  4. text

    "Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life, but define yourself."

    Harvey Fierstein (via observando)

    (via langleav)

  5. text
    theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

    theduplicitytimes:

    6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

    1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
    2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
    3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
    4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
    5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
    6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

    "If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

    (via langleav)

  6. text
    breelandwalker:

fangirling-daily:

fat-pikachu-mas:



denise-puchol:



Comic Book Readers
orkin 1947



what’s this?
Little girls read comics from the very beginning of their incarnation??





“Girl reading comic book in newsstand” by Teenie Harris (c. 1940-1945) © 2006 Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

That sound you hear is thousands of wangsting sexist fanboys shrieking in horror.
Suck it.

    breelandwalker:

    fangirling-daily:

    fat-pikachu-mas:

    denise-puchol:

    Comic Book Readers

    orkin 1947

    what’s this?

    Little girls read comics from the very beginning of their incarnation??

    image

    image

    “Girl reading comic book in newsstand” by Teenie Harris (c. 1940-1945) © 2006 Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

    That sound you hear is thousands of wangsting sexist fanboys shrieking in horror.

    Suck it.

    (Source: denisebefore, via langleav)

  7. notsograndr:

    callmehopeless-notromantic:

    d0ugieslizard:

    mjolnirss:

    alfuhdawg:

    image

    IT’S THE “AGED 27 1/3” BIT THAT MAKES ME CRY WITH LAUGHTER

    this kills me!

    image

    They actually did it, too.

    this is the most adorable thing i’ve seen in my life

    (via dramione13)

  8. text

    boo-tyluvr:

    If a guy calls you princess in a condescending manner assert your newly appointed royal status and have him beheaded.

    (via captainhook-up-with-me)

  9. pastygod:

    shaynthehero:

    That’s how all women should feel about their body.

    This is how everyone should feel about their body

    (Source: imqu3llyb, via dramione13)

  10. hawk-and-handsaw:

    "I… struggle with anxiety sometimes, especially when promoting films like this. Just the life of doing what I do, being in the public eye, it’s a stressful environment." -chris evans

     (beesarealiens)

    (Source: ayyecaptn, via madmaudlingoes)

→

About

I cannot stand most of the people I've met. Sometimes I wish that people can drop dead after hitting a certain level of stupidity.

Search

People I follow